buzzfeed:

Finding a job sucks.

buzzfeed:

Finding a job sucks.

centralsun:

stacking platonics!

centralsun:

stacking platonics!

scienceisbeauty:

Great SMBC today. Anyone who has been involved ever in an Internet discussions will corroborate this graph as pretty accurate.

scienceisbeauty:

Great SMBC today. Anyone who has been involved ever in an Internet discussions will corroborate this graph as pretty accurate.

geglobalresearch:

GE engineer Joe shares videos from the labs showcasing how & why we test! http://ift.tt/1fqoOH5

geglobalresearch:

GE engineer Joe shares videos from the labs showcasing how & why we test! http://ift.tt/1fqoOH5

Folded DNA makes a 3-D nanostructure that is embedded with lipid molecules. Courtesy Wyss.
The lipid molecules attached to the DNA nanostructure act as handles to direct the assembly of a lipid bilayer around the structure. Courtesy Wyss.
The end product is a totally lipid bilayer nanostructure that cloaks the DNA nanostructure from an organism’s immune system. Courtesy Wyss.
Enveloped viruses (bottom) coat themselves with lipids. New lipid-coated DNA nanodevices (top) closely resemble those viruses and evade the immune defenses of mice. Image: Steven Perrault/Harvard.
txchnologist:

Viral Membrane Protects Medical Nanorobots From Immune System

Scientists say they have developed a cloaking device to spirit medical nanorobots of the future past immune systems into diseased cells. Their innovation comes from stealing a powerful weapon viruses wield to infect their hosts.

Some viruses wrap themselves in a protective membrane to avoid detection by their host’s immune system and enter cells they are trying to infect. A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have been able to construct their own version of a viral membrane.

Read More

Folded DNA makes a 3-D nanostructure that is embedded with lipid molecules. Courtesy Wyss.
The lipid molecules attached to the DNA nanostructure act as handles to direct the assembly of a lipid bilayer around the structure. Courtesy Wyss.
The end product is a totally lipid bilayer nanostructure that cloaks the DNA nanostructure from an organism’s immune system. Courtesy Wyss.
Enveloped viruses (bottom) coat themselves with lipids. New lipid-coated DNA nanodevices (top) closely resemble those viruses and evade the immune defenses of mice. Image: Steven Perrault/Harvard.
txchnologist:

Viral Membrane Protects Medical Nanorobots From Immune System

Scientists say they have developed a cloaking device to spirit medical nanorobots of the future past immune systems into diseased cells. Their innovation comes from stealing a powerful weapon viruses wield to infect their hosts.

Some viruses wrap themselves in a protective membrane to avoid detection by their host’s immune system and enter cells they are trying to infect. A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have been able to construct their own version of a viral membrane.

Read More

principemelon:

karaniwangbinatilyo:

THE SECRETS OF NATURE

Cool posters. Too bad string theory is a joke.

principemelon:

karaniwangbinatilyo:

THE SECRETS OF NATURE

Cool posters. Too bad string theory is a joke.

12gon:

cluster 4hedral / 8hedral honeycomb

12gon:

cluster 4hedral / 8hedral honeycomb

fencehopping:

Melting aluminum with an electromagnet.

fencehopping:

Melting aluminum with an electromagnet.

Physics-exploiting axe splits wood in record time

By Ryan Whitwam

Chopping wood is hard, but it’s something modern society has largely freed us from as a daily activity. That’s nice, but consequently, if you ever do have to chop wood, you’re more than likely going to suck at it. Splitting a log requires a surprising amount of force, but Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä has invented a new kind of axe that makes it much easier and safer.

Yes, axes have existed since time immemorial, but apparently there’s still room for improvement.

The Vipukirves does what the name implies, assuming you speak Finnish. It’s essentially acting as a lever instead of a wedge (Vipukirves translates as Leveraxe). A regular axe needs to be driven downward with enough force to separate wood along the grain. That’s a lot of force, and if a log is hit off center, the axe blade can deflect at unexpected angles. That’s not good — your squishy flesh is much easier to split than a log.

So what makes a lever different than a wedge in this scenario? The Vipukirves still has a sharpened blade at the end, but it has a projection coming off the side that shifts the center of gravity away from the middle. At the point of impact, the edge is driven into the wood and slows down, but the kinetic energy contained in the 1.9 kilogram axe head continues down and to the side (because of the odd center of gravity). The rotational energy actually pushes the wood apart like a lever. A single strike can open an 8 cm gap in a log, which is more than enough to separate it.

The inventor also claims this tool is much safer because the downward energy that might cause harm is dissipated gradually as rotational energy. So, no abrupt shock, and no deflection. The Vipukirves also naturally comes to rest on its side, which stabilizes the log and keeps the sharp edge pointed away from the operator. It’s really a clever design.

If you want this crazy physics-exploiting axe, it’s going to cost you. The base price is €193.12 in EU countries, including VAT. For US orders, the base price is €155.74 or about $215, plus €47.26 ($65) in shipping.

Physics-exploiting axe splits wood in record time

By Ryan Whitwam

Chopping wood is hard, but it’s something modern society has largely freed us from as a daily activity. That’s nice, but consequently, if you ever do have to chop wood, you’re more than likely going to suck at it. Splitting a log requires a surprising amount of force, but Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä has invented a new kind of axe that makes it much easier and safer.

Yes, axes have existed since time immemorial, but apparently there’s still room for improvement.

The Vipukirves does what the name implies, assuming you speak Finnish. It’s essentially acting as a lever instead of a wedge (Vipukirves translates as Leveraxe). A regular axe needs to be driven downward with enough force to separate wood along the grain. That’s a lot of force, and if a log is hit off center, the axe blade can deflect at unexpected angles. That’s not good — your squishy flesh is much easier to split than a log.

So what makes a lever different than a wedge in this scenario? The Vipukirves still has a sharpened blade at the end, but it has a projection coming off the side that shifts the center of gravity away from the middle. At the point of impact, the edge is driven into the wood and slows down, but the kinetic energy contained in the 1.9 kilogram axe head continues down and to the side (because of the odd center of gravity). The rotational energy actually pushes the wood apart like a lever. A single strike can open an 8 cm gap in a log, which is more than enough to separate it.

The inventor also claims this tool is much safer because the downward energy that might cause harm is dissipated gradually as rotational energy. So, no abrupt shock, and no deflection. The Vipukirves also naturally comes to rest on its side, which stabilizes the log and keeps the sharp edge pointed away from the operator. It’s really a clever design.

If you want this crazy physics-exploiting axe, it’s going to cost you. The base price is €193.12 in EU countries, including VAT. For US orders, the base price is €155.74 or about $215, plus €47.26 ($65) in shipping.

Herr said this was the first public demonstration of a running gait by powered prosthetics under neural command.
txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis. 

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

Read More

Herr said this was the first public demonstration of a running gait by powered prosthetics under neural command.
txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis. 

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

Read More